When Is Medication Helpful in Losing Weight?

Losing weight can be difficult. No matter how well you eat or how often you exercise, you may still struggle to shed those excess pounds. But diet and exercise are just one part of the weight-loss journey; they aren’t your only options.

At Macomb Medical Clinic, P.C., we can help you on your weight-loss journey with weight-loss medication. When prescribed by a professional, medication may help you shed the pounds. If you’ve tried everything and still can’t seem to lose weight, let weight-loss specialist Dr. Arthur Lieberman help you reach a healthy weight in a safe manner.

Ideal candidates for weight-loss medication

Weight-loss medication may be right for you if your body mass index (BMI) is higher than 30, or if you have other medical conditions related to obesity, such as high blood pressure or diabetes. In selecting the right medication for you, Dr. Lieberman evaluates your medical history, and that of your family. You need to disclose any other medications you might be taking so he can discern potential side effects.

You may not be an ideal candidate for weight-loss medication if you’re pregnant, trying to become pregnant, or nursing. Some side effects may include nausea and constipation or diarrhea, though patients have reported decreased side effects the longer they take the medication. Dr. Lieberman determines which medication, if any, is best for your weight-loss goals and prescribes one that is right for your body.

Lose weight faster with medication and lifestyle changes

Taken over the course of a year, weight-loss medication has been proven to result in a loss of 3-7% of a patient’s overall body weight when combined with a healthy diet and adequate exercise. The medication should be considered a supplement to weight loss and is not meant to be a substitute for developing a healthier lifestyle.

The combination of medication plus a healthy diet and regular exercise helps you lose weight faster than just diet and exercise alone. Doing so can decrease your risk of high blood pressure and diabetes later in life.

Most of our patients stop taking the medication once they reach their goal weight, while still maintaining a healthy diet and adequate amounts of exercise. Patients who still have difficulty losing weight and aren’t experiencing any serious side effects may opt to stay on the medication indefinitely.

If you are interested in learning more about weight-loss medication, you can reach the clinic by calling our Sterling Heights office. We look forward to hearing from you.

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