The Link Between Obesity and Diabetes

Did you know that over a 100 million Americans have Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes? That’s close to a third of the population. This is alarming when you consider that diabetes is a chronic illness that impairs how your body processes blood sugar. If left untreated, diabetes can severely impair your health and even lead to death.

The good news is that Type 2 diabetes is usually preventable and often brought on by lifestyle factors, including carrying excess weight. At Macomb Medical Clinic in Sterling Heights, Michigan, your health is our priority, and we want to make sure that you have all of the tools to keep it well maintained. 

Obesity and Type 2 diabetes

When fat accumulates in your body, it can lead your cells to develop a resistance to insulin. This becomes more of an issue as you gain weight, particularly if the weight gain is significant. Obesity means your body mass index (BMI) is 30 or higher.

Accordingly, weight loss is so important when it comes to preventing and managing diabetes. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, losing just 5% of your body weight can improve your blood sugar. Losing weight can help your body process insulin more effectively and reduce your dependence on diabetic medications. 

Diabetes left untreated

Diabetes is a serious illness and leaving it untreated can lead to other chronic illnesses. So it’s important to tackle the issue sooner rather than later. In fact, your best chance of preventing diabetes is to catch it while you’re still in the prediabetic stage, meaning when you’re at increased risk of developing the condition.

If you don’t manage your weight and your diabetes, you can experience a range of other health problems, including:

The best way to lose weight is to maintain a healthy diet and exercise program. The team at Macomb Medical Clinic can help.

Losing weight as a diabetic

There’s no way around it: Exercise is key to losing or maintaining weight. The Mayo Clinic recommends at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity each day. This includes brisk walking, swimming, or even doing chores around the house. 

When it comes to diet, experts recommend eating more fiber, in the form of fruits and vegetables, and cutting down on saturated fats and added sugars. You also want to drink plenty of water and avoid foods that are high in salt.

Start treating your diabetes today

At Macomb Medical Clinic, we provide medical weight management to help you prevent, manage, or even reverse diabetes. We work with you to formulate a plan that meets your individual needs. 

Don’t wait to tackle diabetes. Call our office today to set up an appointment. 

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